Do We Care Enough About Racial Inequality? Reflections on The River Runs Dry

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Share on print

In
Do We Care Enough About Racial Inequality?
Reflections on
The River Runs Dry, Professor Guy-Uriel Charles
focuses on the underlying assumption of West-Faulcon’s argument, namely,
that the failure to take seriously the problems of inequality that afflict
communities of color—e.g., racial inequality in education—is a consequence
of the absence of (or the failure to recognize) legal tools sufficient
to the task. Charles asserts that the problem is not a lack of
legal tools but the failure of the legal system—as demonstrated in
the Supreme Court’s recent decisions in Parents Involved in Community
Schools v. Seattle School District No. 1
and Ricci v. DeStefano—to
recognize the dignity of people of color in constitutional analysis.
Accordingly, Charles argues that legal academics need to make not just
legal arguments but a renewed case why we ought to care about racial
inequality.

(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)
Close